About your Search

20110301
20110331
SHOW
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWS 84
CSPAN 67
MSNBC 52
CNN 47
CSPAN2 27
KQED (PBS) 12
WMPT (PBS) 9
WRC (NBC) 8
KGO (ABC) 7
KPIX (CBS) 7
KTVU (FOX) 7
WETA 7
WJLA (ABC) 7
WJZ (CBS) 7
WTTG 7
WBAL (NBC) 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 392
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 393 (some duplicates have been removed)
energy user? plus will the iraqi military be ready to guarantee the country's security after u.s. forces withdraw in december? but, first, the chief of navel operations, admirable gary roughhead recently joined reporters from defense news and other gann et media publications to discuss service personnel programs. we bring you excerpts from our wide-ranging interview. we start with personnel levels. in september, admirable roughhead said the navy should have 375,00 sailors but dropped that number. we asked him what changed. >> as we look at the end strength and it's not so much how many people should be in the navy, it really is what are the jobs in the navy and then how many people do you need to perform those functions. so it's very easy to say, well, you know, navy has x amount of people, so that's where we want to be. but what we constantly do as we go through the budget process is we're looking at the forestructure and the functions that have to be performed, and then how do you size that? i would submit that in the navy we in the past few years have done some incredible work to bill
on u.s. foreign policy. i'm ralph begleiter. this week we ask, "should the u.s. give up on haiti?" to help answer this question we'll be joined by great decision participants in dallas and by our experts: ray walser, a senior policy analyst at the heritage foundation and michael shifter, president of the inter-american dialogue. thanks to both of you for being with us on great decisions. right to the top question, "should the united states give up on haiti?" ray. >> the question, i think, is posed in a moral sense, "should the u.s. do a particular, make a particular decision regarding haiti?" i don't think that is the way the question should be posed. "will the u.s. give up on haiti?" and i'm afraid that the answer may be that the u.s. over time, will tend to give up on haiti because the problems that it faces there and the reconstruction process dealing with an impoverished country with low levels of human capital and financial capital, given its tendency to move towards political division, ah, the insecurities there and the competing interests that we face around the world in a
this situation and didn't necessarily think u.n. action or u.s. action was necessary or something that should happen. what was the turning point for you where you thought, okay, it's time to go? >> well, first of all, i laid out the conditions required, which were the u.n. security council resolution and arab league support. and i saw them being taken. and then i thought about what the consequences were if gadhafi was allowed to continue to use force in defiance of international opinion. and so gadhafi looks like he'll have to be dealt with anyway. but this is the slippery slope of intervention, that many of us had been warning about for some weeks is the chorus of cries out there, let's go intervene, let's go do something. once you start this, it has to be finished. it will be very hard now to admit and say to gadhafi, okay, well, you got away with it, okay, now you're the leader of libya, we'll buy your oil. so now we've got a state which is at least in appearances seems to be an outlaw state. >> general clark, stand by. i just want to reset here for our viewers as we cross the top of the h
. right now on "fox news sunday." missile strikes. the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles as coalition forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update on talk with the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen live on "fox news sunday." then two leading senators weigh in on the mix, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works t work contain a nr disaster. we will get the latest from japan and talk with the secretary of energy steven chu. plus, we ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on these issues or following. all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington where we are tracking two major stories. we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and its allies are using military force to protect the antiqaddafi rebels. and in japan, where officials are making progress toward bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that later and talk with the secretary of energy. first, libya, u.s. stealth bombers struck a major libyan airfield. and qaddafi called the raids terr
in u.s. treasuries. >> tom: we ask pimco's bill gross why he's bailing out of government debt and where he's putting money now. you're watching "nightly business" report for wednesday, march 9. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening, everyone. the world's largest bond fund is betting against bonds. pimco's total return fund has sold off its government bond holdings to zero as of the end of february. tom, this is a strong signal from pimco's flagship fund that it sees little value in owning u.s. treasuries. >> tom: susie, as a result of those bond sales, pimco is sitting on $54 billion of cash. the fund still owns other kinds of bonds. it's holdings are diversified among mortgage bonds, corporate debt, foreign bonds and municipal securities. >> susie: so what's the reason behind the bond fire sale? joining us now: william gross, the founder and co-chief investment officer of pimco. hi, bill,
into a supposed u.s. ally by the george w. bush administration when they were searching for something to call a diplomat i can victory after the fiasco that was the fake weapons of mass destruction in iraq. it is hard enough to figure out how americans can best help out popular uprisings of people that want to determine their own future instead of living under a despot. that is hard enough. how do you figure it out when the despot in question is our despot. when he has enjoyed american support, american seal of approval? that's why there was this collective national stomach turning when we saw images of iuste g cannisters thrown at the people in egypt. the u.s. was neutral, then moved against mubarak. but had mubarak kept control of the military, ultimately it wouldn't have been tear gas, it would have been american tanks and f-16 fighter jets squaring off against the peaceful protest movement america was supporting. in libya now, there's some of that same awkwardness. justin elliott had a piece at salon.com that was helpful and interesting, noting that the george w. bush administration's emb
. right now, on fox news sunday. ♪ missile strikes, the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles, as quo litigation forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update from libya, and, talk with a chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, live, only on fox news sunday. then, two leading senators weigh in on the mission, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works to contain a nuclear disaster, what does the crisis there mean for energy policy at home? we'll talk with the secretary of internally, steven chu and we'll ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on the tough issues or following. all, right now on fox news sunday. >> chris: we are trashing two major stories, we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and allies are using military force, to protect the anti-qaddafi rebels. and, in japan, where officials are making progress for bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that, later and talk with the secretary of energy, but, first, libya, allied officials say they hit more than 20 air
and what this could mean for u.s. forces. we're also standing by for a statement from the secretary of state hillary clinton. we're also standing by for a statement from the nato secretary-general in brussels. stand by for that. >>> moammar gadhafi is still on the attack, on this the sixth night of pounding by the coalition forces. an explosion and anti-aircraft fire echos in tripoli just a little while ago. could the outrageous failure at reagan happen again? the fallout, the danger at two planes coming in for a landing radioed the control tower and got no answer. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." let's begin with the breaking news. the united states may be closer to giving up its lead role in the fight to protect lickance from gadhafi's forces. right now there's new uncertainty, though, about a tentative deal for nato to take command of the mission. we have lots of questions about how this might play out and how it might affect the overall goal of seeing gadhafi go away. the secretary of state hillary clinton will make a statement a little more that an hour from no
, if you are just waking up. fresh word from the nation's top military officer after u.s. and coalition forces bombarded libya's defenses overnight. admiral mike mullen tells nbc news there is a no-fly zone in place in libya. that's after more than 110 tomahawk cruise missiles from warships and submarines slammed the antiaircraft units and command posts. admiral mullen also said that possible outcome of the military action could include the embattled leader, moammar gadhafi, remaining in power. meanwhile, gadhafi issued an audio address on state tv, saying the country was preparing for a long war. on the screen, the image of a giant, gold fist crushing an american plane. nbc's jim maceda's in libya's capital of tripoli. jim, with another good day to you, we have cruise missiles that were targeting sites around the city there. what's it like there now? >> reporter: here, it's quiet. it wasn't so at 2:30, 3:00 in the morning, though, alex. we all jumped and jolted first when we heard a number of explosions. it was these deep thuds that you never like to hear. they could have been cruise m
assess what the u.s. and the world are doing now, and what comes next. >> ifill: plus, we examine what the unrest in the middle east is doing to gas prices here at home. >> woodruff: then, we have the first of two reports from guatemala. tonight, ray suarez looks at programs aimed at combating a long history of domestic violence. >> suarez: as part of a nationwide effort to improve women's health these workshops are pushing back against a rape culture trying to lower the epidemic levels of violence against women and girls. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks to scott shane of the new york times about the obama administration's decision to resume military trials at the guantanamo bay prison. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and rel
for the past two days with the u.s. military. trying to get a grasp of a progress report on the ground here. the successes, the frustrations, the planning for the way ahead. the uncertainty that lies along the way in this village, we are 30-miles from the afghan-pakistan border. still, ten years after the start of the war and it's still a hot bed along the border of taliban activity. this place has seen dramatic security change. development has come. not the case across the board in afghanistan but there have been successes in a moment, we'll show you that. you will hear the interview with general david petraeus before he heads back to washington to give a progress report to congress. jennifer griffin is traveling with robert gates as he travels here in afghanistan as well. all of that in a moment. but first, check in with shannon bream in the washington bureau for the top headlines of the day. >> thank you, bret. >> shannon: president obama ended a two-year ban on guantanamo bay and it will come two days ahead of congressional hearing about the danger of american radicalized by the terrori
pushing back against mounting pressure to impose a military no-fly zone over libya. why one u.s. official says it's, quote, an extraordinary complex situation. plus, gas prices soaring as the crisis in libya intensifies. is it time now for the united states to tap into its emergency oil reserve to soften the blow at the pump? and an estimated 18,000 refugees crowded into a tent city near the libyan border as a full-blown humanitarian crisis is unfolding. lots happening right here today in "the situation room." pendingo much money on printing. i'd like to put you in charge of cutting costs. calm down. i know that it is not your job. what i'm saying... excuse me? alright, fine. no, you don't have to do it. ok? [ male announcer ] notre dame knows it's better for xerox to control its printing costs. so they can focus on winning on and off the field. [ manager ] are you sure i can't talk -- ok, no, i get it. [ male announcer ] with xerox, you're ready for real business. and go everywhere. to help revitalize a neighborhood in massachusetts, restore a historic landmark in harlem, fund a local bu
the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality. >> reporter: all of the uncertainty leading to more evacuation of locate from the immediate exclusion zone as well as from sendai the biggest city near the reactor complex. another evacuation center locals grumble over the perceived mishandling of t
, and beyond. what should be the role of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influential voices on foreign policy. john mccain, and joe lieberman. and health care reform one year later. we'll ask our sunday group what is this long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now, on fox news sunday. >> chris: hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday, now authorities worry about al qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, u.s. and allied planes paved the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town of brega. for more let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. steve? >> reporter: chris, a rapid advance by the rebels, they are moving west, quickly towards what they say is an eventual battle, right here in tripoli.
, this time at reactor number 4. martha: the u.s. officials say the next 28-48 hours are critical in stopping and cooling down what's going on inside these reactors. if it doesn't happen, this area could be deadly for many years to come. good morning julian. tell me what the latest is from where you are. >> reporter: i think have much the efforts today to put cold water on the reactors has failed. the helicopters have only marginally put as much water as they wanted to on the reactors. it doesn't seem to be having a regular effect. all hopes rest with the crews trying to link up the electricity line back into the plant that will then allow them to restart the generators which automatically pump cold water onto these heated up reactors and bring temperatures down. all other efforts seem to have failed. the attempt to use fire engines to pump cold water on the reactors has failed. they are look at a single solution now. martha: it sounds like it's up to these people known as the fukushima 50, 180 workers rotating in and out of the plant to limit their own exposure to the radiation. what a coura
's talk about that also with retired u.s. army general george jalwan, the nato allied supreme commander. if in fact this is true that the president in recent days, maybe the past week or two, signed a covert action order, a finding, as they call it, to secretly assist the rebels who are fighting gadhafi's forces, what does that say to you? >> first of all, i have no knowledge of whether he signed a finding or not. it may be one of two things, may be an actual sort of action or it could be keep pressure on gadhafi to really feel the heat that he's feeling now with the resignation of his foreign minister and also with what i think is what is happening in london where the international community is very much united in what needs to be done. >> for all practical purposes the coalition, now nato control, they -- they have taken aside in this civil war, they want to help the rebels and see gadhafi go, even though the u.n. security council resolution didn't go that far as we all know. here's the question. if in fact the president signed a secret finding that goes way beyond what the coalition
, be careful over there. we'll stay in close touch. thank you. >>> u.s. officials say the defection shun of libya's foreign minister shows pressure is having an effect. moussa koussa led to london yesterday. hes the highest ranks official to break with the regime. he once serve as the intelligence chief, and has secrets to tell. the british prime minister says there's no deal of any kind to give moussa koussa immunity. joining us from tripoli, nic robertson. nic, you're getting some reaction from the libyan government on the defection shun of the foreign minister moussa koussa. >> reporter: we haven't had a reaction from the top, gu the government is saying they allowed him to deeffect, because of health reasons. they said he had a heart condition, but it's very clear from the fact that it took them limb 24 hours to respond to the defection that they didn't know it was coming. the government's trying to put the best face on it that they can, but it rings hollow. moussa koussa tricked this government, tricked the leadership and has left the country and left them hanging, wolf. >> how sign
there are people trying it. from tunisia to hosni mubarak, the great u.s. ally of three decades. to yemen, to worries about al qaeda and extremism in that area of the world. he is supposedly our ally against terrorism. even moammar gadhafi, most americans if they think of him at all think of him as a ridiculous cartoon villain. even he has recently been considered an ostensible american ally. whose planes the american military shot down in 1986. a man whose house ronald reagan shot a missile. even gadhafi was made into a supposed u.s. ally by the george call a diplomatic victory after the fiasco that was the fake weapons of mass destruction in iraq. it is hard enough to figure out how americans can best help out popular uprisings of people that want to determine their own future instead of living under a despot. that is hard enough. how do you figure it out when the despot in question is our despot. when he has enjoyed american support, american seal of approval? that's why there was this collective national stomach turning when we saw images of made in the usa tear gas cannisters thrown
report. >> it's just the beginning. >> the u.s. and allies, now seeing the effects of a full scale military operation to stop libya's leader, muammar gaddafi. >> and effectively he hasn't flown any in the last few days, i would say the no-fly zone is effectively in place. >> harris: that was 24 hours ago, and tonight, fox reports live from tripoli. what our journalists on the ground are seeing now. plus, life saving supply already running low in japan's devastation zone. now traces of radiation found in even more food sources. but a month a frantic rush to contain a nuclear disaster. >> earthquake survivors pulled from the wreckage. we're live from japan where a new day begins. we begin tonight with a heavy bombardment by coalition forces inside libya. mixed messages by muammar gaddafi who has called for a new cease-fire and promises to fight to the death at the same time. here is where we stand. the fog calling operation odyssey dawn a success and we're told the no-fly zone is now in effect and cruise missiles and long range bombers have taken out a number of key targets including
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
worrisome are the spent fuel rods in number 4. a top u.s. official warned that the rods are now exposed. a claim that japanese officials later denied. >> in addition to the three reactors operating at the time of the incident a fourth reactor is under concern. we believele there's been a hydrogen explosion in this unit due to an uncovering of the fuel in the fuel pool. we believe that secondary containment has been destroyed. there is no water in the spent fuel pool and we believe that radiation levels are extremely high. >> that does not sound good at all. the japanese government has been trying to cool all the reactors, pumping water into the plant and trying to drop water from helicopters. that had to be abandoned because of rough winds and the radiation threat. there are reports that some workers are getting sick already from radiation exposure which is not surprising. experts are working frantically to restore power to the plant which would restore the cooling system. but willç it work? what options are left if it doesn't? those are really important questions. the u.s. military h
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower radiation over a broad area. it must be said the japanese authorities are denying the report. but just one of several challenges that the authorities have been dealing with, in the last 24 hours. the problems with the stricken fukushima nuclear complex in northeastern japan change by the hour. on wednesday, a new fire ignited at one reactor and radioactive steam burst from another. it prompted remaining workers to be yanked and more residents to flee the area. >> if the fuel rods are exposed the radiation material inside the container could seep out. >> it's also causing the people of t
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
the american people tonight to explain the u.s. mission in libya. the reasoning behind it. the u.s. military's role, and are we go from here. all this comes on the heels of a significant, rather, a dramatic victory for the administration with nato agreeing yesterday to take command of the mission including the ground attack. that as international airstrikes continue for the 9th night over the nation. libya state tv broadcast these images from a southern city of sabha claiming the attacks were against civilians. top nato commander today hitting back against suggestions that nato forces are essentially providing air cover for the rebels. >> our goal, our goal, it is to help protect civilians and population centers from attack or that are the threat of an attack. >>shepard: the in six not to take sides but we have. the opposition is benefiting, before the no-fly zone they were in trouble but this has weakened the military. and now the two sides are fighting on equal terms because of us and they are closing in on muammar qaddafi's hometown, a key government stronghold on the road to tripoli. and
of action, now comes the patrolling of a no-fly zone over libya. that's the word from africa. u.s. military's africa command describes phase two of an allied campaign to protect libyan civilians from their own government. the action phase include add cruise missile strike on the heart of moammar gadhafi's compound in tripoli. libyan officials say no one was hurt, and the allies say gadhafi is not being targeted. the bombed out building supposedly house add military command and control center. after well over 100 missile launches on saturday, an efricon spokesman says operation odyssey dawn as it's called may have peaked. nine other members and nato may take the lead, though that is still being decide. and libyan fighters are still on the move. word from misrata east of tripoli, gadhafi's tanks unleashed absolute destruction and carnage. a witness says they are shooting people in the main street. an exclusive cnn poll finds broad american support for the allied mission. more than 80% say protecting libyans from their longtime dictator should be a somewhat or very important goal of the u.s. b
. radiation levels prompting the u.s. military to consider mandatory evacuation of thousands of american troops and their families in japan. radioactive dust being detected at very low levels, we want to point out in seattle, washington. despite substantial progress over the weekend this is far from over. we're going to have the latest details at this hour, also the latest on the dead and missing now numbering 21,000. and the body of a young american teacher has been found. we talked about her on this show last week, her parents had been searching for her. she's the first known american fatality. we begin though with the attack on gadhafi forces in libya, now entering day four. allied forces launching as many as 80 missions today, that is up from yesterday. americans flying fewer than half of them, that is down from yesterday. according to mission commander, pro-gadhafi forces are mounting little resistance, nor is the opposition taking advantage of air strikes on pro-gadhafi missions. while grateful for the air support, they're having trouble getting organized and have little communicat
are overwhelmed. supplies are limited. plus, the u.s. military is moving in the region. the defense second robert gates now directioning two navy warships into the mediterranean. >>> and a dramatic new development in the race for 2012. the first major republican contender is ready to take a critical step towards announcing a run for president. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." let's begin with the latest developments in the libyan crisis. reports of gunfire and assault in the city of zawiya. that's where forces loyal to the libyan leader moammar gadhafi attempted but allegedly failed to seize control from rebels. meanwhile, a strong show of force against gadhafi just out of the united nations. the general assembly adopting a resolution to oust libya from the u.n. human rights council. we're monitoring the story from every angle on the ground as only the global resources of cnn can. first, let's go to tripoli where gadhafi shows no signs of losing his grip on power in the capital. some residents there have refrained from protesting for fear of simply being killed. cnn's senior inte
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 393 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)